bookgeekconfessions:

I wanted to double check that “The Cherry on Top” was a short novel or novella and I found this on uphillwriting.org. I think it’s very informative and hopefully you guys will find it useful!

palidoozy-art:

So I got a question on ‘how to avoid sameface’ and thought I could do a quick tutorial. And then it took way longer than I thought. Whoops.

Anyway uh, these are some quasi tips/pointers/methods I use to avoiding the dreaded ‘sameface.’ I didn’t get to add it in here, but a lot of it is confidence.

Also—keep in mind that ‘sameface’ is very, very subjective. This is just how I, personally, do it—other artists might have different ideas in character design. I’ve still got a lot to learn myself!

ALSO I TALK WAY TOO MUCH IM SO SORRY

jessfink:

I did a cover for Teen Dog #1 by  Jake Lawrence! It’s in stores this week and it has the power to make you COOLER.

jessfink:

I did a cover for Teen Dog #1 by  Jake Lawrence! It’s in stores this week and it has the power to make you COOLER.

redribbonrobot:

I’ve done a variant cover for nicktapalansky's Thanatos Diver! Be sure to check it out when it’s available :)
- The preorder site for the first issue: http://thanatosdiver.th3rdworld.com

redribbonrobot:

I’ve done a variant cover for nicktapalansky's Thanatos Diver! Be sure to check it out when it’s available :)

- The preorder site for the first issue: http://thanatosdiver.th3rdworld.com

Just curious on how you approach composition and perspective. I feel as if sometimes I think too hard, not really about what to draw but how to draw it and make it look interesting. The comic panels you have been doing are amazing. Any tips/references on improving my knowledge of composition and perspective? What do you think about as you lay your pencil on the drawing paper? what goes through your mind?

jakewyattriot:

*STANDARD DISCLAIMER* I’m not handing down life lessons or trying to assert that there’s a ‘correct way’ to draw. I’m just trying to make perspective more approachable for thems that want to tackle it.

Okay. Let’s do this.

1. Understand what perspective is and what it’s for. Stay away from rulers while you get comfortable.

Everyone struggles with perspective because 1. it’s not well or widely taught and 2. artists tend to see linear perspective as a set of rules rather than a set of tools.

Linear perspective is a TOOL we use to create and depict SPACE. That’s it. That’s all it is. Your goal is not to draw in ‘accurate linear perspective.’ Stay away from the ruler and precision for as long as you can. Your goal is to create the illusion of three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional surface. Perspective is just a tool to help you construct and correct that space.

2. Know in your bones that you can ONLY learn to draw in perspective through physical practice. There is no other way.

Grab some paper and draw with me. If you match me drawing for drawing you will be more fluent in linear perspective and spatial drawing by the end of this post. Unfortunately if you don’t, you won’t be.

3. Sketch around in rough perspective. NO RULERS.

So let’s make some simple space. let’s start with a two dimensional surface…image

K. We have a flat, 2D surface. Let’s create some depth by putting a vanishing point in the middle, and having parallel lines converge towards it. Make a gridded plane inside that space.

image

Good. Let’s make that space meaningful by adding a dude and a road or something. (Again, parallel ‘depth lines’ will converge into the vanishing point along the horizon)

image

And now we have the rough illusion of some space. I didn’t use any rulers, and it’s not perfectly accurate, but we got our depth from that vanishing point right in the middle of the page. And since we have a little dude in there, we’ve got human scale, which allows us to gauge the size of the space we’ve created. Gives it meaning.

You need people or cars or some recognizable, human-scale THING in there as a frame of reference or your space won’t mean much to your viewer. Watch. We can make that same basic space a whole lot bigger like this:image

Same vanishing point in the same place, completely different scale, and a totally different feeling of space. Cool, right?

3. Sketch around in rough perspective MORE. STAY LOOSE.

See what sort of spaces and feelings you can create with vanishing points and gridded planes on a post-it or something. Super small, super rough. Feel it out. Pick a vanishing point or lay out a grid in perspective, and MAKE SOME SPACE. Do it. Draw, I don’t know, a lady and her dog in a desert. I’ll do it, too.

image

Good job. LOOK AT YOU creating the illusion of space! This is how you’ll thumbnail and plan anything you want to draw in space. All of my drawings start this way. I think about how I want the viewer to feel and then play around with space and composition until I find something that works.

Once you have a sketch you like, and space that you feel, THEN you can take out the ruler and make it more accurate and convincing.

4. Draw environments from life.

I cannot stress this enough. Draw the world around you, try to draw the shapes and angles as you see them, and you will ‘get’ how and why perspective is used. Use something permanent so that you’ll move fast and commit. I usually use black prismacolor pencil.

You’ll learn or reinforce something with every drawing. I learned a lot about multiple vanishing points from this drawing:

image

Learned from the receding, winding space I tired to draw here:

image

Layered, interior spaces:

image

You get the idea.

image

Life drawing will also help you develop your own shorthand and language for depicting textures, materials, details, natural and architectural features, etc. Do it. Do it all the time. Go to pretty or interesting places just to draw them.

image

Take a second and just draw a quick sketch of whatever room you’re in.

5. Perspective in formal Illustration: apply what you’ve learned.

1. I always start with research. For this particular location I looked at Angkor Wat.

2. Once I had enough reference, I did a bunch of little thumbnail sketches with a very loose sense of space and picked the one I liked best.

3. Scanned the thumbnail and drew a little more clearly over it. Worked out the rough space before using formal perspective.

image

4. Reinforced the space with formal perspective. I dropped in pre-made vanishing points over my drawing. If I were drawing in real media here’s where I’d get out the ruler to sketch in some accurate space.

5. Drew the damn thing. Because I do my research, draw from life, and am comfortable drawing in perspective, I can wing it. I just sort of ‘build’ the ruins freehand in the space I’ve established, keeping it more or less accurate, experimenting and playing with details along the way. I erase a lot, too, both in PS and when drawing in pencil. Keeps it fun for me.

And that’s what I know about composition and perspective. If you want more formal instruction on perspective and it’s uses, you can use John Buscema’s How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way. Or If you want to get really intense about it, Andrew Loomis can help you.

-Jake Wyatt

joeyart:

X-men storm as Jem and the Holograms. She rides Tauntaun from Star wars while holding beatrix kiddo’s Hattori Hanzo sword and a pink microphone. and yes. that’s star trek enterprise in the sky.

joeyart:

X-men storm as Jem and the Holograms. She rides Tauntaun from Star wars while holding beatrix kiddo’s Hattori Hanzo sword and a pink microphone. and yes. that’s star trek enterprise in the sky.

superrubylove:

SuperRuby at 30th

superrubylove:

SuperRuby at 30th

jessfink:

spikedrewthis:

The Smut Peddler 2014 PDF is now available to non-Kickstarter backers!
Thanks so much for your patience and support, everyone!

AAh! Smut Peddler PDFs are now on sale to everyone!! You can check out my 20 page story, I’m so proud to be in this book. ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

jessfink:

spikedrewthis:

The Smut Peddler 2014 PDF is now available to non-Kickstarter backers!

Thanks so much for your patience and support, everyone!

AAh! Smut Peddler PDFs are now on sale to everyone!! You can check out my 20 page story, I’m so proud to be in this book.

comicsalliance:

HIRE THIS WOMAN: WRITER CECIL CASTELLUCCI
By Janelle Asselin
In the overwhelmingly male comic book industry, it has been a challenge for some editors and readers to see the ever growing number of talented women currently trying to make a name for themselves. With that in mind, ComicsAlliance offers Hire This Woman, a recurring feature designed for comics readers as well as editors and other professionals, where we shine the spotlight on a female comics pro on the ascendance. Some of these women will be at the very beginning of their careers, while others will be more experienced but not yet “household names.”
Cecil Castellucci is a creator of comics, novels, music and film who’s probably best known to ComicsAlliance readers for her work with Jim Rugg on The PLAIN Janes graphic novels. Commissioned by DC Comics for its young adult comics line Minx, Castellucci’s work earned her the Joe Shuster award for Outstanding Canadian Comic Book Writer. She collaborated with March artist Nate Powell on The Year Of The Beasts, a hybrid prose/graphic novel; her book Odd Duck, with Sara Varon, was nominated for an Eisner award for Best Publication for Early Readers; and is a contributor to DC’s new Wonder Woman anthology, Sensation Comics.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

HIRE THIS WOMAN: WRITER CECIL CASTELLUCCI

By Janelle Asselin

In the overwhelmingly male comic book industry, it has been a challenge for some editors and readers to see the ever growing number of talented women currently trying to make a name for themselves. With that in mind, ComicsAlliance offers Hire This Woman, a recurring feature designed for comics readers as well as editors and other professionals, where we shine the spotlight on a female comics pro on the ascendance. Some of these women will be at the very beginning of their careers, while others will be more experienced but not yet “household names.”

Cecil Castellucci is a creator of comics, novels, music and film who’s probably best known to ComicsAlliance readers for her work with Jim Rugg on The PLAIN Janes graphic novels. Commissioned by DC Comics for its young adult comics line Minx, Castellucci’s work earned her the Joe Shuster award for Outstanding Canadian Comic Book Writer. She collaborated with March artist Nate Powell on The Year Of The Beasts, a hybrid prose/graphic novel; her book Odd Duck, with Sara Varon, was nominated for an Eisner award for Best Publication for Early Readers; and is a contributor to DC’s new Wonder Woman anthology, Sensation Comics.

READ MORE

sketchypanda:

kiriiv:

How the fuck do legs work I don’t

image

image

image

I have a few feet ones too.